How Do The Kidneys Work?

kidneys

How Do The Kidneys Work?

At just 4.5” inches, it’s hard to believe the kidneys cleanse upwards of 150 quarts of fluid from your body every day. It can be easy to overlook the importance of kidneys until their wellbeing is in jeopardy, but they are essential to healthy bodily functions. Read on to learn more about the kidney’s role in the endocrine and urinary system and the ways in which they purify your blood.

What Do the Kidneys Do?

The kidneys play a vital role in the human body. These fist-sized organs, located on either side of the abdomen, provide the human body with a unique filtration process to purify blood and remove waste. Proper kidney functionality is imperative to good health, mobility and longevity.

The Kidneys serve several purposes:

  • Regulate blood pressure by releasing a hormone called angiotensin
  • Remove toxins from the body
  • Ensure a stable blood mineral balance
  • Regulate fluids in the body and prevent excessive buildup
  • Filter blood and create red blood cells
  • Maintain vitamin B balance for healthy bones

How Do the Kidneys Work?

The kidneys receive a supply of blood from the renal artery, remove impurities from the blood, and then return the blood to the body through the renal vein. The kidneys remove toxins and unnecessary waste by means of urine, which travels from the kidneys to the bladder.

The human body absorbs whatever food nutrients it needs for energy and self-repair. According to WebMD, “After your body has taken what it needs from the food, waste is sent to the blood. If your kidneys did not remove these wastes, the wastes would build up in the blood and damage your body.”

Kidney Composition

Kidneys are comprised of different parts and tissues. One critically important part is called a nephron. There are more than one million nephrons in each kidney that all work together to remove waste and impurities from the body. Each nephron filters a small amount of blood, which is why there are so many of them within the kidneys.

According to NewHealthAdvisor.com, “There are two types of nephrons. The cortical nephrons, which make up about 85 percent, are found deep in the renal cortex, while the juxtamedullary nephrons, which make up about 15 percent of total nephrons, lie close to the medulla.”

The Impressive Power of the Kidneys

According to the National Kidney Foundation:

  • The kidneys filter about 150-200 quarts of fluid every 24 hours and return it to the bloodstream;
  • Approximately “two quarts are removed from the body in the form of urine, and about 198 quarts are recovered;”
  • Kidneys are under five inches, making them smaller than a computer mouse or a cell phone.

Learn More About Kidney Disease 

At OCRC, we are working to help create a better future for those impacted by chronic kidney disease. We are currently in need of volunteers for our Kidney disease study.

Volunteer qualifications include:

  • Ranging in age between 18-80
  • Presently have kidney impairment or disease

Currently seeing a nephrologist and taking medicine such as Procrit® or Epogen® for low blood count, Aranesp® for anemia, or PhosLo® or Renagel® for high blood phosphorus.

If you are interested in participating, please tell us a little more about yourself in the Contact section of the home page and we will respond to you to determine your eligibility for current and future studies.